Design for Security and Community

"The quality of a neighborhood depends on the quality of design and on the people who live there."

At Bayview Village, design supports community with human-scale, three story buildings, courtyards that foster knowing one’s neighbors, and quiet, traffic-free walkways. The Village encourages social interaction at the office and shops in the Village Square. Round-the-clock security adds an extra dimension of safety, reinforcing social ties. The design invites people outside in good weather to walk, jog, or sit on the porch. Those who want privacy will have it; those who want social interaction will enjoy the Village community center, the residents’ association, and community events. All these elements combine to support a sense of community with respect for diversity.

Cars:

The lack of cars helps both safety and security. Safety is significantly improved by reducing exposure to the dangers of traffic as a driver or as a pedestrian. The walking “street” is inherently safer. Security is improved because cars are used in the great majority of crimes against strangers. No cars makes “casing” a target and getting away more difficult.

Defensible Space:

Bayview Village fosters social patterns that create security. Defensible space is provided by windows overlooking the walkways and other areas, keeping “eyes on the street.” Courtyards are small enough to support neighbors knowing who belongs there. Also, sightlines, lighting and landscaping are designed for security. The courtyards and the play area are safe places for children to play in view of their parent’s home. Community ties--neighbors looking out for one another--makes for a safe neighborhood.

Public Safety Access:

Police cars, fire trucks, and ambulances have free access to the walkways, which are designed for emergency access.

Site Security:

Site managers will staff the office around the clock and patrol the site. They will be available by cell phone, and it will be easy for residents to call. There will be security cameras and phones along walkways.